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What presidential declaration could mean for local opioid crisis

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<p>FARGO&mdash;President Trump is doubling down on efforts to fight the Opioid Crisis.</p><p>He is declaring the crisis a national emergency.</p><p>Locally, it could mean additional funding and power for agencies to fight the issue.</p><p>President Trump is making it clear.</p><p>"We have no alternative, we have to win for our youth. We have to win for our young people," said Trump.</p><p>He wants to try doing more to fight the opioid crisis, which has claimed more than a dozen lives in Fargo since 2016.</p><p>This, only a day before the North Dakota Department of Human Services announces several communities will receive grants to combat the issue.</p><p>"To address the opioid crisis in North Dakota Communities across the spectrum of care," said Laura Anderson, of the North Dakota Department of Human Services.</p><p>The grants will focus on helping dependent people find resources.</p><p>"Increasing access to treatment services, recovery support services, and focusing on reducing overdose related deaths," said Anderson.</p><p>The president's declaration could mean even more funding to supplement what the state is already doing.</p><p>In Fargo, there have been half as many calls to police for overdose as there were at this time last year, and fewer deaths.</p><p>While Fargo-Moorhead's strategy seems to be working, some say additional avenues are needed.</p><p>"The resources out there right now are great for people who are ready to quit, which isn't everybody," said Jeremy Kelly.</p><p>Jeremy Kelly of the Good Neighbor Project has campaigned to spread reversal drugs and harm reduction resources.</p><p>It's not clear if the President's declaration would mean more reversal drugs in the hands of first responders, but everyone involved in this fight agrees if attention and understanding of the issues continue to grow, it will help.></p><p>F-M Ambulance and Dilworth Police now carry the reversal drug Naloxone.</p><p>The Good Neighbor Project also offers training in Naloxone use.</p>

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