INFORUM.com | WDAZ.com

WDAY: The News Leader

Published December 06, 2013, 07:51 PM

"Heartsprings" is using innovative therapy to help those with Parkinson's

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - Who would ever think that slapping a pair of headphones on, turning on Mozart, and exercise could be so life changing, but a group of people living with Parkinson's Disease is finding that a North Fargo class is helping "pound down" some of Parkinson's evil impacts.

By: Kevin Wallevand, WDAY

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - Who would ever think that slapping a pair of headphones on, turning on Mozart, and exercise could be so life changing, but a group of people living with Parkinson's Disease is finding that a North Fargo class is helping "pound down" some of Parkinson's evil impacts.

It is all part of a Fargo based non-profit called "Heartsprings" that uses therapy to work with those suffering neurological diseases.

“good”

A youth room at Messiah Lutheran in North Fargo, is hosting a list of little miracles.

“Now lift so you can lift to the side or forward.”

Things you and I take for granted every day. Balance, speech.

“Hopefulness, that they can chance it is listed as a chronic progressive disease, and I want them to know they can change their physiology what we are doing is re wiring the brain, strengthening the old pathways and find new ones.”

Today, Bruce Anderson, who has lived with Parkinson's 15 years, Betty Ingebretson, diagnosed three years ago at 57 and retired teacher Bob Cobb, came for one of their last classes of the fall.

Bruce Anderson/Member of Class: “A sense of well-being, and my handwriting has improved, my balance has improved.”

Heartsprings uses music, usually Mozart to relax the clients, as they focus on these balance and visual exercises.

Betty Ingebretson/Member of Class: “I feel like my movements are more purposeful and agile and I think my ability to converse as well, subtle as well. Up and down the stair effortlessly.”

And it is not just Mozart and classical musical, the headphones are equipped with a bone conductor device and that device stimulates the skull and inner ear.

Bob Cobb/Member of Class: “I think it works, the sound and movements, coordination kind of like juggling for me.”

This is the only study of its kind in the country. 11 weeks to see if these three see progress and changes.

Clearly, all of them say, it is working.

Cobb: “They creep up on you the illness progresses but when you beat them back it is slow but it is a great experience.”

The family of our beloved Marv Bossart is looking at supporting and working with Heartsprings. There is a Parkinson's nonprofit now in his name, and his family has come to watch how this works. Following the exercises, the clients sit down to visit and journal about their progress.

The good news, they've had a lot to write about.

The method used in the Parkinson's treatment is similar to that used in children with autism.

Tags: