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Published November 08, 2013, 09:02 PM

Philippines woman in Fargo as typhoon approaches home country

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - It's being called the 'Storm of the Century', and it's blasting its way across the Philippines, as we speak. There are reports of 100 bodies in the streets of one of the cities hit by the typhoon.

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - It's being called the 'Storm of the Century', and it's blasting its way across the Philippines, as we speak. There are reports of 100 bodies in the streets of one of the cities hit by the typhoon.

While the monster typhoon may sound a world away.

Right here, in Fargo, a woman is waiting in worry as her family braces for the catastrophic weather.

While Fe Emerson has lived in America for 11 years, she distinctly remembers growing up seeing typhoon after typhoon.

And even though the media is branding this storm, a record setting one.

Fe says it's something as common as we see snow storms.

In between frames,

Inside Sunset Lanes,

And behind this bar you'll find Fe.

Born in the land of what she explains as beyond beautiful.

Fe Emerson/Family Weathering Philippine Typhoon: "It's just that when we have typhoons, it's just a disaster."

Fe remembers playing as a child, water waist deep and thinking nothing of it.

That didn't surprise us, after finding out - on average eight or nine typhoons slam the country each year.

Emerson: "We grow up with that. We always saw the typhoon. So, it's not new things for us."

But this one is different.

The major storm is measuring winds up to 235 mph, stretching at least 300 miles wide.

A distance comparable to a trip from Fargo to south of the Twin Cities.

And it's that news that scared Fe.

Emerson: "Panic I worried you know."

Because, besides it being her home country.

Five of her brothers, three of her sisters and her father still call Tanjay City their home.

Emerson: "Big family." ah "and they're all in the Philippines?" "They are all way back in the Philippines. I'm the only one here in America."

The explosive storm isn't the first to destroy and kill, back in 1989, Typhoon Elsie left over 300,000 homeless, and Fe would have been just 24.

Emerson: "I saw a shack flew passed our front bridge."

Here, Fe is fine, and with her family only a phone call away, their safety is her only concern.

Emerson: "Those things are replaceable. So for us, we need a spot where every body's safe and then we're okay."

So far, Fe's family has only reported rain.

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