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WDAY: The News Leader

Published November 06, 2013, 08:35 PM

Kevin Cramer holds "Coffee with Cramer" town hall

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - In the eastern part of the nation last night-- a Republican won a second term in a traditionally blue New Jersey, while Democrats racked up notable wins in Virginia and New York City.

By: Drew Trafton, WDAY

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - In the eastern part of the nation last night-- a Republican won a second term in a traditionally blue New Jersey, while Democrats racked up notable wins in Virginia and New York City.

"How about this New Jersey?"

A 20 point win for Republicans in New Jersey and a close loss in Virginia wasn't necessarily on Congressman Kevin Cramer's list of items to talk about on Wednesday morning when he met with constituents over coffee in downtown Fargo.

"It's just a big deal to me to have that connectivity."

But election night certainly blipped on his radar.

"The world is a little upside down isn't it?"

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie won re-election. Leading some to believe he'll be a front runner in the GOP nomination process for president in 2016.

Gov. Chris Christie/R-New Jersey: "If we can do this in Trenton, New Jersey, maybe the folks in Washington, D.C. should tune in there TV's right now and see how it's done."

Cramer thinks the lesson to be learned from Christie before his own midterm race next year has less to do with New Jersey and more to do with voters looking for results.

Rep. Kevin Cramer/R. North Dakota: "People are looking for solution oriented politicians, regardless of the ideological or philosophical convictions of on or the other."

And voters weren't only finding those solutions through GOP promises.

Last night Republicans lost New York's mayoral office for the first time since the 1980's. A close election in a formerly bold red Virginia.

Terry Mcauliffe/ Gov. Elect of Virginia: "Well, there are a lot of proud Democrats here, and aren't we proud, tonight folks."

But Cramer thinks the Democrats may have had an assist when it came to winning that race.

"The Libertarian candidate got over 6 and a half percent and that's no small matter."

And as a Republican, Cramer is aware a fragmentation in his voting base could create a case of defeat being snatched from the jaws of victory in North Dakota.

But Cramer says he doesn't think third party candidates are a bad thing.

Cramer: "I'd rather win their support, frankly."

And that, in fact, political activism even through early morning coffee talks. Just may hold the key to victory in 2014 and beyond.

Cramer's only official challenger to his seat in Congress so far happens to be Libertarian.

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