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Published October 28, 2013, 10:17 PM

Auctioned horses rescued

West Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - We brought you the story of kill-buyers out to purchase horses at last week’s auction in West Fargo. This week, some of those horses have been rescued by local ranchers.

West Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - We brought you the story of kill-buyers out to purchase horses at last week’s auction in West Fargo. This week, some of those horses have been rescued by local ranchers.

In the auctioneering world, everything comes down to time.

Jordanne Hogenson- Horse Owner: “It goes really quick and you gotta pay attention to what’s going on.”

You could miss the best of horses up for bid. In this case, you could save some of the worst.

Hogenson: “The horses that weren’t really doing much.”

Like five mares; some ready to foal, which were immediately sold to buyers who take the horses across the border for slaughter.

This girl found herself in the wrong place at the wrong time.

In what Jordanne calls the scary and bizarre atmosphere, she closely followed another horse through the shoot. Auction employees didn't want that.

Hogenson: “Slammed the door in her face and what I was told is that she got caught under her chin and pulled back, and she had a big gash on the side of her face, a big gash down the center of her face that was down to the bone.”

She wasn't the only unsightly horse to be found in the barn; hundreds come in looking like skeletons, many sold to be slaughtered.

But rescuers like Dr. Richard Bowman step in.

Richard Bowman: “These horses, I understand, are in relatively poor shape.”

Although he already owns 60 well-fed and cared-for horses, he ponied up the cash for two of the five mal-nourished mares, which will likely take months to heal.

Three more mares were caught just in time. They're resting in Galchutt, North Dakota tonight, and this little guy just three months old, now his home with Jordanne.

Hogenson: “A lot of the meat buyers won’t buy yearlings or ponies because they’re not worth the time.”

She spent just $10 on the colt; one less horse out of harm’s way.

Hogenson: “Kill-buyers took home most of the horses that day.”

The horse we showed you, which was cut up during auction; that vet bill was $400. So far, the West Fargo Central Livestock Auction says it's not willing to pay.

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