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Published October 25, 2013, 08:51 PM

Concordia auditorium under analysis

Moorhead, MN (WDAY TV) - The Campus of Concordia Moorhead sent out an alert Friday afternoon: A letter, warning staff and students that a structural analysis is underway looking over the Memorial Auditorium.

Moorhead, MN (WDAY TV) - The Campus of Concordia Moorhead sent out an alert Friday afternoon: A letter, warning staff and students that a structural analysis is underway looking over the Memorial Auditorium.

Yes, for now, officials say the memorial auditorium is safe; that is until the flakes start falling.

Concordia's biggest concern is the stress-heavy snow packs will pile up on the roof.

Alan Dostert- EAPC Architect: "You'll see some evidence of sagging over time."

That's just it. Time is the real issue here because a lot of it has passed by since the auditorium was built back in 1952.

Architect Alan Dostert says that shouldn't be a problem.

Dostert: "Unless there was some leakage or something like that… But generally, the roofs are maintained well. The structure integrity, from the time they're built, will last indefinitely."

Dostert says you can tell if a roof is failing sometimes moans and groans, creeks and cracks, but by then, it's too late.

Concordia officials couldn't say when or how they first noticed the issue.

All the Senior Director of Communications Roger Degerman would tell us is this:

Roger Degerman- Concordia College Spokesperson: "We have discovered an issue in Memorial Auditorium to snow load capacity of the roof, and we want to get to the bottom of it so we're working with structural engineering experts."

Alan Dostert is not the expert Concordia is working with, but he does know our climate can bring on heavy, wet snow that can be very dangerous.

Dostert: "It can happen in bar joice; metal roofs. It can happen in wood roofs. You just want to avoid getting them overloaded time and time again."

So how to fix it: How do you take this 1952 auditorium back in time?

Dostert: "It probably involves some additional structural analysis and some adding of structural members, whether it be wood members or steel members, and just shoring it up."

And that's what Concordia is currently doing.

An analysis will be underway in November, causing the building to be shut down for up to a week.

Some sort of long-term plans will be developed after the analysis is complete.

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