INFORUM.com | WDAZ.com

WDAY: The News Leader

Published August 14, 2013, 10:00 PM

With school looming, sleep rescheduling should start now

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - After a long summer off, getting your kids back into a proper sleep routine can be a challenge. With some schools in our area starting next week, it’s a good idea to start planning now.

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - After a long summer off, getting your kids back into a proper sleep routine can be a challenge. With some schools in our area starting next week, it’s a good idea to start planning now.

Three months of long nights and late starts to the day are soon going to end.

Amy Crowell – Fargo: “It's pretty hard, we've had to have some early arguments already were trying, were trying to ease into it.”

Mom Amy Crowell knows the troubles of re-regulating sleep schedules. She's already preparing for the first big day of school.

Amy Crowell: “We're trying to do 15 minutes a day. I'm waking them up earlier and them letting them be tired enough that they want to go to bed.”

Sanford Pediatrician Dr. Scott Stephens says this is one of the best things parents can do.

Dr. Scott Stephens – Sanford Pediatrician: “You can try scaling back an hour at a time.”

Dr. Stephens says that's because it can take days for your body to readjust.

Dr. Scott Stephens: “It takes about a day per hour difference that we're changing. So, if your children have been getting up at 9 o'clock and now need to get up at 7 for school, it's going to take at least 2 days to adjust to that.”

A school age child needs an average of 10 hours of sleep per night. If that amount isn't met your child could experience fatigue, moodiness, lack of concentration. If you don't stick with a consistent sleep pattern, you'll be sure to see lower grade scores.

Dr. Scott Stephenson: “Social interactions, they have more problems with that, even such things as driving.”

Another rule to follow, which is hard for even us adults to do: No computers, cell phones, or iPads at least an hour before bed.

Dr. Scott Stephens: “Those bright screens make it harder for us to go to sleep. The body thinks it’s still light outside and tries to stay awake.”

Although it's tough to say goodbye to summer, Crowell says she'll stick to the advice so she'll have happy instead of grumpy students come the 22nd. Lack of sleep can also cause anxiety in children.

Tags: