INFORUM.com | WDAZ.com

WDAY: The News Leader

Published May 18, 2013, 05:10 PM

One Fargo Marathon runner is there for her 8-year old daughter

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV)-- A lot of these runners get up early and go on this grueling trek for others, or to remember others who still tug at their heart.

By: Becky Parker, WDAY

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV)-- A lot of these runners get up early and go on this grueling trek for others, or to remember others who still tug at their heart.

That's the case for Jil Fiemeyer, she lost her 8-year old daughter Jane to A.L.L. leukemia in September. Jil's first half-marathon today was for Jane.

21 kilometers. 13.1 miles. It's far longer than Jil Fiemeyer had ever run before.

But then, she has never had a stronger motivation than she does today.

Jil's 8-year-old daughter Jane died in September, after more than a year battling A-L-L leukemia.

Jil Fiemeyer- Lost her Daughter to Cancer: "If Jane could endure what she did in her 13 months of treatment, I can do 13.1 miles."

And she's wearing her heart right on her sleeve.

Jil: "Jane is on my left, because I tend to look to my left more. When those moments get rough, you have these inspirational reminders as you run."

On her right arm, the name Kayleen, Jane's friend from the Children's Hospital, who also lost her battle with cancer.

Jil ran with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society's team.

Katie Locke- Jil's Race Mentor: "She is so strong. One of the strongest women I've ever met. She has had to fight through the loss of her daughter and dealing with the depression of that the last eight months or so, and she's had to push herself to train for this event."

Jil dedicated the 8th mile of the race to Jane, and the 9th mile to Kayleen. Their ages when they died.

Jil: "The brain surgery that she had to have, or the chemo she needed to have, or the punctures that she needed in her spine. And think back to all of that that she put up with like a trooper. That's going to get me through mile 8, mile 9, and all the way to mile 13."

And this mother's courage may have gotten us not one step, but thousands of steps closer to a cure.

Jil: "Jane had a 90% chance of survival and yet she didn't survive, she lost her life. So, 90% doesn't mean anything, we need 100%."

After the race, Jil posted this photo on Facebook after receiving her half-marathon medal at the Fargodome.

Tags: