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Published April 09, 2013, 09:23 PM

A bill in the North Dakota legislature hopes to make electronic stun guns legal

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV)-- A bill in the North Dakota legislature hopes to make electronic stun guns legal in the hands of you and me, no longer listed as a dangerous weapon under state law. The bill has passed the house and senate, and will become law if the governor signs it.

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV)-- A bill in the North Dakota legislature hopes to make electronic stun guns legal in the hands of you and me, no longer listed as a dangerous weapon under state law. The bill has passed the house and senate, and will become law if the governor signs it.

They're one potential option in a line of self-defense products, stun guns.

Don Fischer - The Spy Shop: "You can get this one that looks like a cell phone. This one is pretty powerful and looks like a flashlight. You can get them in a cane or baton."

Authorities say the electro muscular disruption device works best when it's in direct contact with skin, but it's best to read the manufacturer's directions.

Assistant Chief Mike Reitan - West Fargo Police Department: "The neck would be some place that would discourage somebody, hand and arms, any place you can get direct contact."

While stun guns and tasers are both electroshock weapons - the legislature is only looking to legalizing stun guns. A taser - would still be considered a dangerous weapon as it fires two probes, which stick under the skin, delivering a high voltage.

Mike Reitan: "When you put a probe here and a probe here, then all of the muscles are affected."

Mike Reitan, Assistant Chief with West Fargo Police Department, says stun guns only affect the muscles directly in contact with the shock.

If you're thinking of purchasing a stun gun, but are worried about a potential attacker overpowering you, there are devices in place for that. One stun gun comes with a safety pin, so if an attacker tries to grab it from you, you just pull out the pin and it becomes disabled.

Tess Kirkland - Area Resident: "I don't know anyone who has been in a situation who would need something like that, but I can imagine that there would be. This is Fargo. There's still lots of people here."

If the bill is signed into law it would go into effect in August.

Authors of the bill say the push for this legislation came from concerned women in the oil fields.

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