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Published March 01, 2013, 08:55 PM

Students have an eye-opening experience learning about electronics

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) -- Usually, dissection is a part of high school biology class, or a medical program. But today, a group of electronics students dissected eyeballs.

By: Becky Parker, WDAY

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) -- Usually, dissection is a part of high school biology class, or a medical program. But today, a group of electronics students dissected eyeballs.

It was a way to explore careers in nano technology.

These high school students are getting an eye-opening experience.

Kristi Jean/NDSCS Nano Science: "You have an eye in front of you. What kind of eye is it?"

They are dissecting eyeballs, cow's eyeballs, to be specific, in a quest to learn more about careers in electronics.

Grant Feldner/Century High School: "It's a little different. I can't say I expected to be cutting open eyeballs."

Kristi: "cornea up front, there's going to be a lens, iris..."

The 25 students come from a 3-year electronics program in Bismarck. Many are planning to pursue careers in electronics after graduation.

Jonathan Rixen/Bismarck High School: "Just the tiny little things we deal with everyday to the massive things that power our lives."

That's where the NDSCS nano technology program comes in. They are exposing these students to the endless possibilities of tiny electronics.

Kristi: "What we try and do is introduce futuristic applications that really sound sci-fi. They sound like you'd only see it in the movies. The reality is that a lot of these things are part of our everyday life."

The eyeball dissection helped students understand how nano technology can help blind people see.

Just last month, the FDA approved these types of retina implants.

The field of nano technology is growing rapidly. These days, electronics are all about being smaller and faster. So, these instructors are trying to foster students' interest in those types of careers.

Grant: "It makes me think I can probably work anywhere. Everyone can need an engineer. If you can put computer chips in eyeballs, I mean, what else could I do?"

Kristi: "Let's focus on the eyeball side."

Making things smaller has never been bigger. The students also toured the "clean room" and worked with cantilevers.

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