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Published January 30, 2013, 06:05 PM

Suicide letter found after finding body of 27-year-old

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) – Twenty seven-year-old Colter Dallman left an emotional suicide note for his parents, written days before authorities found his body south of Fargo Monday.

By: Kevin Wallevand, WDAY Staff Reports, WDAY

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) – Twenty seven-year-old Colter Dallman left an emotional suicide note for his parents, written days before authorities found his body south of Fargo Monday.

His parents and suicide prevention experts say we can all learn something from the letter Colter wrote.

The parents of Colter shared this letter with us, in hopes that the pain of his bi-polar disorder, going on and off medication, and the struggles he endured every day will encourage at least one person or family to get help.

During the last few weeks of his life, Colter Dallman struggled so much with his mental illness, he, at one point, flew to Guatemala where he expected to be crucified. A cross was even built. He thought he was the savior. He returned to North Dakota to die, but not before writing a moving letter to his parents, a sometimes rambling, but often honest, heartfelt words to his parents.

"I have been tormented from the other side though times in this life and I have imagined of what it could be like to transcend this version of reality that I am trapped in." he wrote.

Carolyn Woodruff, Colter’s Mom: “We had tried to prepare ourselves for this but you can't prepare for this.”

Morgan Dallman, Colter’s Dad: “Colter was very caring and concerned and tormented.”

His parents hope his troubled life, a roller coaster of mental health issues, will help families going through the same thing.

First Link in Fargo actually has master trainers who work with counselors and community members working with those at risk of suicide.

Cindy Miller, FirstLink: “We need to ask, so if we have doubts and questions we ask, what is the worst thing that can happen, “No mom I am having a bad day. I am a little depressed but I am not thinking of suicide,” but you have opened the door and you are there if they need help.”

Colter told his family “It seems the world is doing what it will without me. Please forgive me and I forgive those who have wronged me. But I now go to God.”

Mary Weiler of Fargo lost her daughter to suicide and now helps direct AFSP an organization in our region that offers training to agencies and support to families dealing and coping with suicide.

Mary Weiler, AFSP-North Dakota: “You are opening the door to people and allowing them to talk.”

It is Colter's mother's wish that his story will spark a conversation. She says ashamed and afraid of what people would think of his mental illness. A secret he kept from nearly everyone. His final farewell, a son's thanks. "Thank you for having me, he wrote, and for being great parents."

For more on local suicide prevention information, go to WDAY.com and click on easy links.

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