INFORUM.com | WDAZ.com

WDAY: The News Leader

Published September 15, 2012, 05:03 PM

Crookston police debut a program to ensure a new driver is prepared to drive

Grand Forks, ND (WDAY TV) -- Now that school is back in session, there are a lot of young drivers on the roads.

By: Christine Boggy, WDAZ, WDAY

Grand Forks, ND (WDAY TV) -- Now that school is back in session, there are a lot of young drivers on the roads.

State Farm, police, and high schools across the country are getting drivers prepared through a program called Celebrate My Drive.

It's the most exciting day in a young teenagers life, getting their drivers license. However, it's also one of the biggest responsibilities a teenager will take on.

Ashley Manning/Teenager preparing to drive: "It's dangerous and you do need to take responsibility when you're behind the wheel but then at the same time it can be kind of a fun thing as well if you do it responsibly."

To ensure a new driver is prepared, State Farm and Crookston high school along with the police and fire department have teamed up to debut a teen driver safety program called Celebrate My Drive.

Adam Oman/State Farm Insurance: "Our goal here is just to celebrate new drivers and the freedom that comes with it, get people excited about it but also think of all the dangers that come into place."

According to the Center for Disease Control, car crashes are the number one killer of American teens and their first year on the road as a new driver is most dangerous.

Officer Don Rasicot/Crookston Police Department: "The first year of driving is the most dangerous for children because they don't have the experience or sometimes judgment that they would need that more a experienced driver has with years behind their belt."

The program featured an impaired driver golf cart obstacle course, a rollover simulator, a vehicle extraction demonstration, games and fatal goggles that gave teenagers a taste of what It's like to be impaired.

Ariel LaPlante/Teenager preparing to drive: "It gives you the impression of being drunk both night and day…makes you really dizzy and discombobulated.

Organizers say the main goal wasn't to scare or lecture teenagers but to give them a hands-on learning experience that will help them when they actually get behind the wheel.

Officer Don Rasicot/Crookston Police Department: "The fact is we want this to be a learning experience and not a scare tactic and if we do it in a practical application sense, then they can see for themselves just exactly what we're talking about so we don't look like adults or law enforcement officers preaching."

14 schools across the US and Canada will receive a $100,000 grant from State Farm.

Tags: