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Published September 08, 2012, 10:27 PM

Fargo trees are changing with the weather

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) -- Blame it on a change in the weather. Trees are noticeably different this season, and our mild winter and hot-dry summer has a lot to do with it. For example, there's an abundance of these fuzzy, pink pieces on the backs of leaves, and some other big changes too.

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) -- Blame it on a change in the weather. Trees are noticeably different this season, and our mild winter and hot-dry summer has a lot to do with it. For example, there's an abundance of these fuzzy, pink pieces on the backs of leaves, and some other big changes too.

The ground is littered with acorns, or, what's left of them, after squirrels decide to turn them into a tasty treat.

Haberman: " I've noticed a heavy production of acorns yes"

Fargo Park District's Forester says weather-stressed trees are trying hard to stay alive, adding to an increase in acorns this year.

Haberman: "That's a response for the tree to get more offspring."

Now another change you may start noticing with Oaks, or other species of trees, See these pink and white fuzzy nodules here? These are actually called galls. And inside the gall is an insect egg.

Haberman: "along with the egg, other chemicals get injected in there and it caused the plan to create these deformities."

You've likely seen an egg-protecting gall, even if you haven't noticed it. The plant material can be all sorts of shapes and sizes. Check out all these white ones here.

Smith: "Different species of wasps, insects, mites, form galls of different characteristics."

And have you noticed that familiar crunch? People say trees are turning fall colors quickly.

Reimann: "They are losing leaves a lot earlier than they usually do.."

Haberman: "you're seeing the fall colors early.."

Weather played a part in all these changes. Yet it's only one piece of the puzzle.

Smith: "It's hard to nail it down, this is what caused it. This is what caused it."

Despite all the changes, foresters say between the galls, acorns, and early leaf drop. Trees are suited for survival, and likely won't be affected long-term.

The pink, fuzzy galls common in Fargo parks are typically wasp eggs.

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