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Published June 07, 2012, 10:18 PM

Doctors seeing continued rise in internet self diagnoses

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - Doctors and nurses are seeing an annoying trend rapidly rise in healthcare clinics. Before any patient comes into the office, they've already diagnosed themselves by using Google. A new study shows 1 in 4 women are misdiagnosing themselves on the internet.

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - Doctors and nurses are seeing an annoying trend rapidly rise in healthcare clinics. Before any patient comes into the office, they've already diagnosed themselves by using Google. A new study shows 1 in 4 women are misdiagnosing themselves on the internet.

We all do it, something doesn't feel right, you go to Google, type in the symptoms and viola you know if you need a doctor or not right?

Penni Weston – Nurse Practioner/Essentia: "About everyone that comes in here and actually the older generation if they don't look it up they have a family member look it up."

Nurse Practitioner with Essentia Penny Weston says there's far more bad than good with this idea of online self-diagnoses.

Penni Weston: "Where I see that it's a huge advantage is once they go to their provider and they've been given diagnoses that they go home and look up info about the illness."

The most common problem she sees missed is anxiety, because symptoms can mimic an array of health issues specifically with your heart.

Penni Weston: "Dr. Google is telling them they're having a heart attack or symptoms of MS because they have to have a disease and nobody is going to look up a mental health issue."

Weston says Google-images are extremely misleading, because if you type in an STD or certain rash the most bizarre, graphic and flat-out gross pictures will pop up first.

Penni Weston: "And so that's really scary for them and sometimes cause them not to come in and they really don't have anything."

Like most things in this world, convenience has its price, and Weston says it could cost you your health.. Weston says one advantage to looking things up before a checkup is that some patients will ask better questions.

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