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Published April 22, 2012, 08:51 PM

Thousands celebrate 42nd Annual Wacipi Pow Wow at UND

Grand Forks, ND (WDAY TV) -- Thousands of people are celebrating Native American culture this weekend at the University of North Dakota for the 42nd Annual Wacipi Pow Wow.

By: Meagan Millage, WDAZ, WDAY

Grand Forks, ND (WDAY TV) -- Thousands of people are celebrating Native American culture this weekend at the University of North Dakota for the 42nd Annual Wacipi Pow Wow. More people than ever are participating in this year's pow wow. Marking the end of a week-long American Indian event on campus.

Randall Morin, Dancer: "We're our own people and we know we're proud and we're strong."

Randall Morin has been dancing for ten years. He participates in pow wows with his family and says the friendships he has made are important.

Randall: "I've met a lot of new friends, new family. I've met a lot of family that I didn't know I had."

Pow Wows are a way for people to come together and sing, dance and preserve their heritage.

Deanna Rainbow, UND Indian Association President: "We want people to be able to come and learn about American Indian culture, you know, and actually see what our culture is about."

The Wacipi Pow Wow marks the end of the UND Indian Association's 42 annual Time Out week. It's a week of activities celebrating American Indian culture and heritage.

Randall Morin: "They can see a different side of things and they'll be able to see how much pride that we have in a people as ourselves."

The Wacipi Pow Wow brought in 29 drums and around 600 dancers from across the United States and Canada... Offering a unique opportunity for dancers to express and share their tribe's culture.

Deanna Rainbow UNDIA President: "We feel it's important for everyone in Grand Forks.. North Dakota especially because of the wide variety of tribes that are represented in North Dakota and also the wide variety of tribes that are represented by students who attend UND."

UND also has an American Indian heritage poster campaign going on, featuring nine graduates making changes in their tribal communities.

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