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Published February 21, 2012, 06:46 PM

Photoshop blurs the line between fantasy and reality

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - The recent release of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition is shocking some readers. Not because of the model's beauty, but because of the over-the-top Photoshopping, leaving people to wonder what's real.

The recent release of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition is shocking some readers. Not because of the model's beauty, but because of the over-the-top photoshopping, leaving people to wonder what's real.

If you're in the market for a fancy head shot, Photoshopping comes standard. The truth is, with this technology you can do much more than banish a blemish.

Photographer Patrick Scherling says these artificially bronzed bodies - like this one, this one, this one, and frankly all of them in Sports Illustrated - are common in every magazines on a mission to make money.

Patrick Scherling – Scherling Photography: "They want those people, those pictures to look perfect, and they're not. Their skin looks smooth and silky, but it's not. Skin is just not that way."

It's that picture of perfection that keeps more than 10 million Americans with eating disorders focused on retouching and not reality.

Dr. Kim Lahaise – Sanford Eating Disorders Institute: "One woman could look at that picture and not make anything of it, but someone who is at risk for an eating disorder could look at that have all kinds of powerful thoughts."

While nationally, magazines may take models to the extreme, most photographers use Photoshop as a confidence boost.

Patrick Scherling: "It's just a little enhancement to make it just that much better."

Scherling's Photoshopped an unflattering picture of me in less than 20 minutes. They popped my pale features.

Patrick Scherling: "A lot of people don't like their picture when they take it. But when you take a picture and Photoshop it and make it look better, take the wrinkles and the blemishes out. It's just a better picture."

In a culture where sex sells retouching is the new reality. Doctors say just 2% of people actually have the body type portrayed in all magazines.

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