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Published January 14, 2012, 08:48 PM

Volunteer firefirefighters learn how to save lives in Kindred

Kindred, ND (WDAY TV) -- With grain bin rescues on the rise, some much needed training. Volunteer firefighters are finding out what can mean the difference between life and death.

Kindred, ND (WDAY TV) -- With grain bin rescues on the rise, some much needed training. Volunteer firefighters are finding out what can mean the difference between life and death.

Tim Zehnder is one of the instructors teaching the life saving techniques.

Some of the things these volunteer firefighters will be learning is how to use life safety rope and sked boards.

TIM: It capsulates or cacoons the victim for us to be able to bring them out of the bin vertically rather than horizontally stretcher type thing.

Along with these individual exercises, Zehnder walks these men through a real live grain bin rescue.

TIM: We will actually have them go in, do the building of the shrowd around the victim, shoveling out the grain and then packaging them, building a mechanical advantage, lifting them out of the bin and then lowering them to the ground.

Zehnder says training courses like this will allow these volunteer firefighters keep up with the latest grain bin rescue techniques.

TIM: This is a really good thing to keep what they have learned on their own, but also to give them new ideas and try to make something better.

One firefighter soaking up the much needed knowledge is Adam Schultz. He is a volunteer with the Lisbon Fire Department. A rancher by day, Schultz knows just how dangerous grain bins can become for an operator.

ADAM: Grain bins now are the size of elevators used to be, so I think it is just a matter of weighing the odds about we getting into a situation.

With all the dangers it is extremely important that there is no time wasted when rescuing someone, and fire fighters being ready when that call comes in could make the difference between life and death.

TIM: Statistics are showing us that from the time the pager goes off, until we get to the scene we have a two percent chance of brining someone alive out of a bin.

The next training is in Minot next month.

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