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Published May 24, 2011, 08:55 AM

Homeowners affected by the diversion have no way out

Kindred, ND (WDAY TV) - The Corps ran into strong opposition at tonight’s public meeting. It's the 2nd of 4 meetings, this one in Kindred, the area most affected by the diversion. There is a good chunk of homeowners out in that Bakke Addition who have children graduating, or are retiring themselves and have no reason to stay in the subdivision, but now have no way out.

Kindred, ND (WDAY TV) - The Corps ran into strong opposition at tonight’s public meeting. It's the 2nd of 4 meetings, this one in Kindred, the area most affected by the diversion. About 400 people filled the Kindred High School.

The main question leaders in that area want answered is Can the metro afford this diversion? They say at 1.7 billion the Corps is putting out a low number, saying more money will be needed for Oxbow buyouts, there are 9 cemeteries Affected, and moving each grave is 3 thousand dollars.

Also, farmland and the Oxbow golf course have not appropriately been appraised. Signs were hung, and people wore reflective vests that oppose what they call a Fargo Dam.

JUNE SKARIE – Horace: “Some people have been on this land for hundreds of years. So what do you say? That's too bad, we'll buy you out and you can go live in Fargo. Who wants to live in Fargo? If we wanted to live in Fargo, we'd be living in Fargo. We don't want to.”

MIKE BICE – Hickson: “How is it the Cass County Commission doesn't recognize Kindred School District or the people of Bakke Addition, Hickson, or Oxbow. You’re a County Commissioner not a Fargo City Commissioner.”

The people who are outraged by the proposed plan obviously want to stay, many of them invested into the school system and area, but there is also a group of more soft spoken people who say they feel trapped.

There is a good chunk of homeowners out in that Bakke Addition who have children graduating, or are retiring themselves and have no reason to stay in the subdivision, but now have no way out. They say with the diversion plan and possible buy-outs looming, their homes have virtually no value.

Dan Veit is back and forth on the diversion.

DAN VEIT - Can Not Sell Home: "I'd like to see everyone come out of this in a decent manner, if there is such a thing."

He built this home in 97. The plan was for him and his wife to stay about 15 years, and then when they both retire, move on.

"We want to move down the road to a warmer climate."

Well times up, he's ready to move but can't. He says there's no market for a home with no value. His only option is for a diversion to come and his home bought out, but that at best is 10 years away.

"We can't take care of everything in 5, 6 years, it's an acre lawn, a lot of snow to blow."

Floods have brought in the good and bad to Bakke. All lots sold out after it was the only dry spot in 1997. Now, still dry, the 2009, 10 and 11 floods might be its demise, but when? No one knows when and if a diversion will be built.

"Well you have to live somewhere and living here isn't the worst thing in the world, we just had different plans and at this time they're put on hold."

We talked to a couple of local realtors today. They confirmed this, until the future is clear on what will happen with that area, they say there is no market for the homes.

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