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WDAY: The News Leader

Published September 04, 2010, 02:17 PM

Minnesota family shows off our agriculture roots

Thousands this weekend get a chance to take a look at our Agriculture roots, but for a Minnesota family, the process of separating grain otherwise known as threshing is a business. At the same time, they use their old time knowledge to teach anyone willing to learn.

Rollag, Minn. (WDAY TV) - The town of Rollag is filled this weekend with steam, smoke, and the sound of old time farming. The 57th Annual Steam Threshers Reunion is going on this weekend.

New this year is the Allis Chalmers expo. The event brings people back to American Agriculture history. Organizers say this is the biggest year in 3-years for attendance. Demonstrations of how machinery works and old time tractors are on display.

“Its a nice way to spend a long weekend and just remember the past and see some friends you haven't seen in a year and just enjoy the weekend before summer's done.”

Thousands this weekend get a chance to take a look at our Agriculture roots, but for a Minnesota family, the process of separating grain otherwise known as threshing is a business. At the same time, they use their old time knowledge to teach anyone willing to learn.

It's a symphony of sounds of a well oiled machine that was the life of our nation’s agriculture.

Paul Eidbo: "Oh yeah, it brings back plenty of memories, you know it’s just very pleasant."

The Mighty 28 threshes out tons of grain. It’s a lot of work, but the Edin family would have it no other way.

Clara Edin: “If you don't use it then it just becomes something to look at."

The Minneapolis machine has been passed from farmer to farmer since it was built in 1916.

Colt Edin: "We've met some grandchildren of the original owner; they've pulled the levers on the machine."

The Edin family bought it 3 years ago over a campfire and a handshake from a friend and this weekend are turning the gears or history to show thousands what life on the farm used to be like.

Colt Edin: "There is a lot of lost art, or lost skills that go in to working one of these things."

It’s a year long operation for the Edins. They run their own old time farm out of Askov, Minnesota.

Clara Edin: "We enjoy machinery, we enjoy seeing how it works, the power of it. We just have a good time."

It’s an operation that might be outdated, but is anything but dull.

Colt Edin: "You have to manage the fire differently and the water differently so you're always on your toes. So that why these things are such a joy to run."

As long as people like the Edin family carry on the old traditions or farming, the history lesson will continue for these people in Rollag and many more to come. The Western Minnesota Steam Threshers Reunion goes through the weekend. It wraps up Monday in Rollag.

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