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F-M Hornbacher's stores could be affected by Supervalu data breach

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Fargo, ND– At least five of the six Hornbacher’s in the metro area are among 180 Supervalu grocery stores that may be affected by a data breach of the company’s computer network that processes card payments.

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The Eden Prairie, Minn.-based company, whose brands include the Fargo-Moorhead Hornbacher’s stores, reported a data breach in the “portion of its computer network that processes payment card transactions” in a news release on its website Friday.  

Spokesman Jeff Swanson said four Hornbacher’s stores in Fargo and one in Moorhead were in the list of stores possibly affected by the breach. He was checking Friday afternoon on whether the breach includes the Hornbacher’s Express in Fargo.

According to the release, the breach may have resulted in the theft of account numbers, expiration dates, numerical information and cardholders’ names, according to the release.

Jennifer Dirk, manager of deposit administration and servicing at Gate City Bank in Fargo, said that what the release refers to as “account numbers” is more accurately described as “card numbers.”

The card numbers may have been compromised, but cardholders’ checking-account numbers were not, he said, adding that when customers use a card to buy something, only the card number is transmitted.

Swanson said that the company had no evidence of the data’s misuse and decided to report the breach out of “an abundance of caution.”

Gate City Bank didn’t received a high volume of calls from worried customers Friday.

“We thought there would be, but it’s been fairly quiet,” Dirk said. She said that may be because the breach wasn’t on some customers’ radars yet.

Supervalu estimates the cardholder data was taken from cards used between June 22 and July 17 at 180 retail grocery stores and stand-alone liquor stores operating under the Hornbacher’s, Cub Foods, Farm Fresh, Shop ’n Save and Shoppers Food & Pharmacy names. Twenty-nine franchised Cub Foods stores and stand-alone liquor stores may have also been affected.

Federal law enforcement authorities have been notified and are investigating, Swanson said. The report was not delayed as a result of investigation, according to the release.

Swanson said he did not know a specific timeframe about when the company will find out more.

“We believe the intrusion has been contained,” he said. “We’re confident … that customers can continue shopping and feel safe in shopping.”

Gate City Bank encourages customers to monitor account activity. If their information has been compromised, they will not be liable and the bank will reimburse them, Dirk said. Gate City Bank, like others, has a fraud detection service that monitors for transactions outside of normal spending patterns.

Hornbacher's President Matt Leiseth could not be reached for comment Friday.

For more information:

Supervalu is providing a live call center to answer customers’ questions at (855) 731-6018. The center will be staffed from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday starting Monday. The phone number plays a message with information about the breach.

Banks recommend that customers carefully review financial statements, and Supervalu lists three additional steps people can take: requesting a security freeze, ordering and carefully reviewing a free credit report and placing a fraud alert on a credit file.

More information about these three precautions can be found atwww.supervalu.com/security.html.

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Grace Lyden
Grace Lyden is the higher education reporter for The Forum. Previously, she interned at the St. Paul Pioneer Press, after graduating from the Missouri School of Journalism in 2014. She welcomes story ideas via email or phone. Have a comment to share about a story? Letters to the editor should include author’s name, address and phone number. Generally, letters should be no longer than 250 words. All letters are subject to editing. Send to letters@forumcomm.com.
(701) 241-5502
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