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DNA Tells Surprising Family Roots

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We all want to know where we come from. Around here, it is not too hard for some of us. Tracing our family roots has exploded and there are websites out there that make it pretty easy. Recently, National Geographic has taken the world by storm with its Geno 2.0 project. It reveals that a little DNA tells us a lot about our past.

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WDAY 6 Reporter Kevin Wallevand loves learning about his family history. And lately, he's learned a lot. He already knew he was Norwegian through and through. He's even been to what his family jokingly refers to as " The Holy Land", which is Norway. He's been to the home place there, and recently a relative has traced his ancestry back to the 1400's in Norway.

Kevin says, "Geno 2.0. Your story Our story. The human story. Let's do this."

It is called the Genographic Project, an effort to where did we all originated.

Kevin says, "If we find out I am Greek, we are in big trouble."

How did we come to populate this earth?

Kevin says, "Here we go."

And so he did his part.

Kevin says, "Like flossing."

After a few cheek swabs, he did some quick steps to insure it will make the shipment, and then sent it off to UPS. Once National Geographic received the sample, it was a matter of waiting.

Kevin says, "After six weeks of waiting, we have been checking the National Geographic Website, and the results are in, so let's check it out. Finally, I checked the website, and along with my secret Geno 2.0 code, finally saw the results were in. Did my DNA come from Norway as expected, or God forbid, was I Swedish? A little surprise here folks, I am 46% Northern European, 34% Mediterranean, and 19% Southwest Asia. Yikes!"

And it makes sense. Further study taught us, that 30,000 to 40,000 years ago, people from the Middle East andSouthwest Asia made their way to Scandinavia. In fact 43% of all Scandinavian men today carry genetics from that part of the world. As for Mediterranean, let's just say, the Vikings got around.

Kevin says, "Still Norwegian, but now I know, most of us think we know where we came from, are proud of it, but there surely is more to our story."

To come up with the final conclusion, the Genographic Project analyzed more than 130,000 markers from Kevin's entire genome to gain insight to his ancestry. 

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